Skip directly to search

Skip directly to content

 

Placing the customer at the centre of your business transformation

 
 

Next Gen Insights | Justin Marcucci |
23 April 2019

When it comes to embarking upon a fundamental business transformation, one of the biggest mistakes you can make is incorrectly prioritising the customer - the ‘user’ - in the decision tree and design process.

To be clear, most businesses are beginning to realise that customer experience is important. After spending the first 20 years of my career imploring decision-makers to carefully consider user needs and expectations, it’s refreshing to see it becoming a more common practice, and as a result, I am nursing delicate embers of hope for the continued prevalence of this thinking in our industry.

There are numerous statistics that back up this thinking. The number of companies who believe that they offer great customer experience was measured by Bain to be at 80%, but the number of companies whose customers agreed with that statement was as low as 8%. There is clearly a gap. This is because there is a difference in believing customer experience is important and understanding how to transform your business to prioritise it.

The pivotal shifts that need to occur when organisations undergo a transformation are centred on perspective and vantage point. When most companies begin this process, they approach decisions incorrectly and without the right perspective on the problems to be solved.

A decision, by definition, is the deliberate selection of a course of action based upon the logical processing of collated facts or data. Most businesses establish a factual basis for transformation using their existing architectural components, systems, and platforms, and these building blocks become the foundation upon which all other decisions are built.

While this is certainly a practical approach, it dramatically limits the transformational impact of the endeavour. By following this approach, unspoken limitations are placed on any ensuing product or experience because it has to mirror the existing arrangement, functionality and data boundaries present in the base IT estate.

These businesses discuss new products, new features and new functionality, but do so within the vertical silos of their existing platforms. They essentially limit the scope of their transformation from the very start. They apply old thinking when attempting to solve new problems, stemming from where they choose to prioritise the user.

It sucks – and customers are not going to keep quiet about it anymore. Thanks to social media, customers have a platform to praise or condem a brand publically. United Airlines lost $1.4 billion when their share price dropped 4% overnight as a reaction to a Facebook video showing the poor handling of removing a customer from an overbooked flight. It’s clear customer experience can affect every aspect of your business, especially your bottom-line.

In reality, the overall customer experience should sit at the heart of any business strategy and be prioritised in all transformation programs. A customer’s experience is comprised of all the user episodes which exist within a business or product line. The rating of a CX ‐ and the variance between ‘good’ and ‘great’ ‐ is determined by the aggregate user effort needed to complete those episodes. The less effort required, the better the experience.

When a user interacts with your business, they are trying to complete a macro-task ‐ a user episode ‐ whether that’s buying something, creating an account, looking up information or changing their details. Users don’t care about the architecture of your systems or the vertical platforms within your technology estate. But chances are that to complete that full user episode, the user will need to cut horisontally across a large portion of that estate, pulling data and accessing functions that live in several distinct systems.

When you begin the transformation process using your core architectural components as the primary basis for decisions, you’ll never deliver a truly transformational customer experience, as you’ll be designing products around what is possible technically for your existing architecture, and not what is ideal for your users.

Instead start your transformation by documenting all of the user episodes needed for your customers to transact. Then, one by one, redesign those episodes to decrease the effort required, removing steps from the process and reducing the time needed to complete tasks. Then take a step back and reconsider the design for a supporting architecture that will optimally enable those user episodes. What you’ll find is that the resulting platforms will represent a dramatic change in your current state, and probably won’t resemble the vertically-oriented business platforms in place today.

This is not a bad thing. It might not have been something you planned on doing, but it’s critical to delivering exceptional CX ‐ and it’s this kind of reoriented thinking about infrastructure that will allow it to scale more elegantly as the needs of the business continue to change over time.

You wouldn’t want to build a beautiful new home on an uncertain foundation – and you certainly don’t want to do it with beautiful new products. Strengthen and reimagine the core of your business IT systems, and recognise the kind of change internally and externally that truly transforms companies.

Remember, the basis for transformation is change.

Justin Marcucci

Chief Digital Officer

Justin has spent the last 20 years helping clients provide the kind of customer experiences that build lasting brand loyalty. As chief digital officer, Justin combines strategy, creativity and technical know-how to unite the agendas of CMOs and CIOs. If you think that sounds impossible, don’t worry, he is a rock-star that understands quantum physics, a husband to a woman who is cooler than he is, a father to three awesome kids and an excellent public speaker. The man is unstoppable, except if you pass a whiskey bar, he’ll definitely want to stop there.

 

Related Articles

  • 17 December 2019

    Demystifying omnichannel and making it a reality

  • 08 October 2019

    How do you rate as a Business Sponsor?

  • 02 July 2019

    Is your payments provider 3DS2 ready?

  • 07 May 2019

    Failure to launch - Why contactless in the US is behind the rest of the world

  • 23 April 2019

    Placing the customer at the centre of your business transformation

  • 08 April 2019

    Get Emotional - How Feelings Dominate Decision Making

  • 04 February 2019

    Can a business thrive in the age of continuous innovation?

  • 07 January 2019

    Delivering Business Value at Speed: A Recipe in Three Steps

Most Popular Articles

The Four Pillars of Truly Digitised Organisations – Part 1
 

Next Gen Insights | Graeme Fordyce | 03 April 2020

The Four Pillars of Truly Digitised Organisations – Part 1

The Cultural Adoption of Healthtech
 

Next Gen Insights | Les Jordan | 25 March 2020

The Cultural Adoption of Healthtech

Understanding authentication and open banking as a soft POS reality approaches
 

Next Gen Insights | Nick Telford-Reed | 10 March 2020

Understanding authentication and open banking as a soft POS reality approaches

Data Privacy in Healthcare - A Q&A with Dan Pelos
 

Next Gen Insights | Dan Pelos | 02 March 2020

Data Privacy in Healthcare - A Q&A with Dan Pelos

Celebrating Twenty Years of Reimagining the Relationship Between People and Technology
 

Innovation | John Cotterell | 07 February 2020

Celebrating Twenty Years of Reimagining the Relationship Between People and Technology

Nick Telford-Reed Shares His Predictions On Three Topics Ahead Of MPE
 

Next Gen Insights | Nick Telford-Reed | 28 January 2020

Nick Telford-Reed Shares His Predictions On Three Topics Ahead Of MPE

Platforms and Partnerships: Will MWC reveal the new ecosystems needed to exploit 5G?
 

Next Gen Insights | Andrew Brown | 23 January 2020

Platforms and Partnerships: Will MWC reveal the new ecosystems needed to exploit 5G?

How to Create a Company Culture that Encourages and Withstands Failure
 

Innovation | Teodora Chetan | 14 January 2020

How to Create a Company Culture that Encourages and Withstands Failure

MaaS technology – multiple extensions or a complete overhaul?
 

Next Gen Insights | Tony Whitehorn | 19 December 2019

MaaS technology – multiple extensions or a complete overhaul?

 

Archive

  • 03 April 2020

    The Four Pillars of Truly Digitised Organisations – Part 1

  • 25 March 2020

    The Cultural Adoption of Healthtech

  • 10 March 2020

    Understanding authentication and open banking as a soft POS reality approaches

  • 02 March 2020

    Data Privacy in Healthcare - A Q&A with Dan Pelos

  • 07 February 2020

    Celebrating Twenty Years of Reimagining the Relationship Between People and Technology

  • 28 January 2020

    Nick Telford-Reed Shares His Predictions On Three Topics Ahead Of MPE

  • 23 January 2020

    Platforms and Partnerships: Will MWC reveal the new ecosystems needed to exploit 5G?

  • 14 January 2020

    How to Create a Company Culture that Encourages and Withstands Failure

We are listening

How would you rate your experience with Endava so far?

We would appreciate talking to you about your feedback. Could you share with us your contact details?

 

By using this site you agree to the use of cookies for analytics, personalized content and ads. Learn More